Gossip, Close-Mindedness, Anger, Ignorance, & Moving On (22m) – Episode 018

Episode 018 looks at paying attention to the gossip your friends tell; protecting yourself from getting defensive when you read opinions you don’t agree with; not responding for at least 15 minutes when something makes you angry; the importance of acknowledging that you don’t know something and using it as a bonding opportunity; and moving on from a job that no longer serves you well.

Mask Fine Theft by Government

The first shut-down was a terrible idea. I’d be willing to forgive those responsible since it was done in ignorance. No one knew how dangerous the virus might be, and sketchy reports from other countries scared some people into over-reacting. However, now we know. To shut the economy down again — to shut down society — isn’t ignorant, it is an intentional act of sabotage. Those responsible should be held accountable. Personally, not by shifting the burdening onto their tax victims.

Six Presidents

The Presidents of the United States are a motley crew.  So far the scorecard reads 45 attempts, 45 klunkers.  I am not saying there were no honorable persons in the group (“honorable” itself is a very iffy word).  I have the highest regard for the intellects of Jefferson and Madison.  I believe that John Adams was among the greatest lawyers (a rare occurrence).  But, to me, there is no such thing as a great President.  To have been one places a black mark on that career.  Few have risen above.

Natural Law, Fictions, Context

In this post, we will examine 3 related areas of discussion.  They are related in that general failures to understand them are the sources of most (if not all) of our problems in the history, and pre-history, of the Sapiens species.  Natural law governs everything in the real world, but we need to create fictions to draw meaning among the events of natural law.  And we need to understand context to have more precise knowledge among the consequences of natural law interacting with human adaptation.

Planned Retrogression

I have been teaching computer literacy since the last millennium (since 1997 in layman’s terms), and I am amazed at the volume of innovation that we have seen in those 2+ decades.  I am amazed in two ways:  1) at the progress, and 2) at the lack of progress.  I will not belabor you with a discussion of the progress, since it is all around you.  But I will try to explain my contention that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Learning New Things Challenges You

There have been many times when a friend has introduced me to something I knew next to nothing about; something they were enthusiastic for, and before long I had gained a new appreciation. It doesn’t necessarily mean it becomes something I’m seriously interested in, but I can still appreciate it through new eyes.