Food Delivery Rape, Protectionism, Government Murder, & Monopoly (28m) – Episode 379

Episode 379 has Skyler giving his commentary on the following topics: his superhuman ability to not savagely rape the attractive women he encounters while delivering food; how every businesses and economic regulation by government is just a form of protectionism on behalf of some special interest; why democide and genocide doesn’t justify the few and far between government innovations that have benefited humanity; the missing incentives and market pressures of lowering prices and increasing quality from industries that are more or less monopolized by a single provider, including government; and more.

Chris J. Returns, Learning Spanish, 19 Essential Skills (1h30m) – Episode 372

Episode 372 welcomes back Chris Jenkins to chat with Skyler on the following topics: learning Spanish; culture shock moments in Chicago for Skyler and Philadelphia for Chris; gringos con latinas (white boys with hispanic wives); Mises Institute events; Monopoly on Violence documentary; Atlantic Council and it’s Utah connection in Jon Huntsman, Jr.; Richard Grove’s Autonomy course and 19 Essential Skills download; integrity; gratitude; culture of excellence; scarcity/abundance mindset; can-do attitude; delegation; adding/selling value; kids and household chores; and more.

With Remote Learning, Schools Are Watching and Reporting Parents at Alarming Rates

As remote learning creates more distance between school districts and students, school and state officials are clinging to control however they can. From sending Child Protective Services (CPS) agents to investigate charges of neglect in homes where children missed Zoom classes last spring, to proposing “child wellbeing checks” in homes this fall, government schools and related agencies are panicking over parents having increased influence over their children’s care and education during the pandemic.

Democide: Understanding the State’s Monopoly on Violence and the Second Amendment

Gun control is predicated on the belief that private citizens cannot be trusted with firearms. That the state should have a “monopoly on violence” because it is less violent than individuals. And that firearms should be taken away from private citizens because only the state is responsible enough to handle them. There is, however, a major problem with this: States are statistically far more violent than individuals. After all, in the 20th century alone, 262 MILLION people died at the hands of their own governments.